Needle Felted Winter Scene (using new felting techniques!)

For the holidays, I’ve designed a needle felted winter scene and several needle felted ornaments that utilize NEW FELTING TECHNIQUES!!! The first needle felted project is a winter scene…..

Needle Felting with Angelina fiber 

Winter scene using Angelina fiber

Winter scene using Angelina fiber

This beautiful winter scene of three pines trees and two snow covered deer use Angelina fiber in the creation of the needle felted trees.

angelina fiber

shredded green Angelina fiber

Angelina Fiber: This fiber comes in all different colors and can be blended with many types of textiles; when heated it bonds with the fibers creating a beautiful shiny, sparkly effect. You can find this Angelina fiber here or here. These shiny fibers are the perfect extra little something to make your felted creations festive!

Materials list: 25g. green wool, 4  felting needles, sponge (felting surface), .05 oz. green, .05 oz. white, heat bondable Angelina fiber, felting handle, 100g.  poly fiber-fill stuffing (pillow stuffing), thread, iron, glue, paint brush, white glitter.

bind tree shapes with thread e

1. With sewing thread, bind poly fiber-fill stuffing into a cone shape.

Approximate Poly fiber-fill/wool breakdown:
Large Tree: 45g of poly fiber-fill/ 9g green wool
Medium Tree: 30g of poly fiber-fill/7g green wool
Small Tree: 17g.of poly fiber-fill/5g green wool

base shape of trees e

2. Cone ready to felt with green wool.

felt base shape green e

3. Felted cone (tree). Needle felting is the art of sculpting raw wool with special needles. The needles mesh the wool fibers together, creating a firm and durable form. This craft is surprisingly simple and fun!

felt angelina fiber into trees e

4. Felt (poke continuously ) the wool covered cone with the Angelina fiber; it takes patience to felt the Angelina into the cone because it’s a little unruly.

felt white angelina fiber last e

5. Felt the white Angelina fiber (snow) on last.

iron the tree e

6. After the Angelina has been felted into the pine trees set your iron to the silk setting and use an ironing cloth while ironing the Angelina fibers. Iron for only a few seconds.

ironed tree e

7. Felted, ironed Angelina tree; the fiber changes color once it’s ironed. The finish is stiff and a little “crispy”.

Three needle felted pine trees with Angelina fiber.

Three needle felted pine trees with Angelina fiber.

Felt the trees in different shades of green for a more interesting look.

Snow covered deer

Snow covered deer

8. Paint a little glue onto the deer; sprinkle with white glitter.

Winter Scene banner e

Add white or silver glitter to a few deer, rabbits or other foresty friends to make the winter scene come alive :) Put them on a silver platter and use them as a holiday center-piece.

Happy winter crafting!

Laura

Ryijy Textile Rugs-Vintage and Modern Styles

November 22, 2014  |  Art, Artistic, Textile Art, Wool Artistry
rag rugs

1m x 1m textile knotted rag rug by Laura Lee Burch

I made several hand knotted rugs and wall hangings about 9 years ago; they were useful but seemed to be more artful than utilitarian. In my sewing studio I had accumulated many fabric scraps, organized in bags by color.  When I looked at the pallet of colors and textured textiles they seemed like pots of color ready to be woven together to create something beautiful! I was never able to accurately calculate the number of hours it took me to make one  1m. x 1m carpet but I’d guesstimate around 20 hours to cut strips of fabric, knot them onto a plastic grid and trim the fabric.

blue rag rug

1m x 1m blue knotted textile rug by Laura Lee Burch

rag rug style wall hanging

38cm x 38cm knotted pink Heart Wall Hanging by Laura Lee Burch

Because of my earlier foray into textile carpets, the Ryijy (rough and shaggy pile) Rug Exhibit in Budapest last summer interested me. The early Ryijy carpets (as early as the 9th century) weave alternates a knotted pile with a tapestry weave; these carpets are the most famous Finnish textile. Ryijy carpets started as black, gray and white, later plant dyes were used to add color and it was only in modern invention of synthetic dyes that the carpet colors became brightly colored. Ryijys carpets were originally made for a brides trousseau, as coverlets, bedding, prayer carpets and pieces for special occasions that were later hung inside the house. As the carpet evolved it’s beauty and artistry brought it into the realm of home decor. The carpets are works of art, detailed, tactile and colorful!

Ryijy Rug Exhibit Budapest

Ryijy Rug Exhibit Budapest

Ryijy carpet

Early Ryijy carpet-geometric motif

Early Ryijy carpet

Early Ryijy carpet

Ryijy Rug-geometric

Ryijy Rug-geometric motif and muted colors

The folk art and Geometric patterned  themes of Ryijy carpets of the 1920’s and 30’s was changed by several innovative artists.  Eva Brummer was originally a painter, she made water color paintings as preliminary designs for her carpets, she chose the threads and closely monitored the carpet weaving by professional weavers. Ms. Brummer wanted to show feelings and sensitivity, she used soft forms and colors in her carpets. Long and rough piles helped to give the carpet surfaces softness. Her favorite subjects were hour glasses and crosses.  Another style changing artist was Uhra Simberg-Ehrstrom, in her artistic infancy her carpets evoked dreamlike feelings, later she wove large strips of rich color, she used many shades of a hue which made the weaving difficult. The artist Ritva Puotila also changed the look of Ryijy carpets by using new materials in her weaving such as paper string, silk and metal. Ms. Puotila often used Finnish folk designs as a motif but made them look very modern, she designed for the Finnrya company who used machines to weave Ryijy carpets. My favorite fact about the Ryijs carpets stated that the longest of the carpets were often hung on the wall, overlapped onto a sofa and continued onto the floor; an interesting look!

Ryijy Rug-black and white

Ryijy Rug-early style of black and white

Ryijy Rug-geometric and colorful

Ryijy Rug-geometric and colorful

Ryijy Rug-geometric and muted colors

Ryijy Rug-geometric and muted colors

Ryijy Rug-geometric and blue and grey

Ryijy Rug-geometric, hour glass motif

Ryijy Rug-geometric and green

Ryijy Rug-geometric and green

Ryijy Rug-geometric and red dot

Ryijy Rug-geometric and red dot

Ryijy Rug-geometric and purple

Ryijy Rug-geometric and purple

Ryijy rug-modern

Ryijy rug-modern colors

Ryijy Rug-geometric and patterned

Ryijy Rug-floral pattern

Ryijy Rug-long pile

Ryijy Rug-long pile and revolutionary materials

Long pile

Long pile and revolutionary materials

long pile

long pile

Goth Halloween

October 6, 2013  |  Costumes, Holidays, Purim, Sewing

goth crown ehttps://www.etsy.com/shop/CostumeRenaissance

It’s time to talk about costumes again; one of my favorite topics! I haven’t made many full costumes lately, but a friend of mine Sara Rabinovich is a master seamstress and is creating  some wonderful Halloween/Holiday get ups! The wonderful thing about Sara’s pieces is that she designs them, makes the pattern for each piece and sews them together with finesse. I used to buy store-bought patterns for sewing, until I moved to Israel I was unfamiliar with the pattern-making process. If you can make your own patterns (as well as sew your own costumes) your creative possibilities double! Two of my favorite costume accessories are the crown and the Ruff. Sara’s black crown is based on the Gothic style: tall and pointed; this crown works well for a Halloween Goth princess but I also think it could be worn by the Evil Queen for an Alice and Wonderland themed costume. A Ruff (short for ruffle) is a piece to cover the tops of the gathered shirts worn in the 16th and 17th centuries. Sara’s Elizabethan ruff sits like a cloud around the neck;  it’s made from black organza trimmed in exquisite lace. The ruff is adorned with hand-sewn white beads and the neck band is made from satin, so as not to irritate the skin. You can see many more of Sara’s fine handmade ruffs on her Etsy site: https://www.etsy.com/shop/CostumeRenaissance?section_id=12065759.

Renaissance neck piece worn in the 16th and 17 century (western Europe)

Renaissance ruff worn in the 16th and 17th centuries (western Europe).

The rest of this handmade costume make it suitable for a Goth Princess, a masquerade ball as well as elegant Vampire attire! The skirt is made from organza with layers of tulle to give the skirt a “lift”.

See more of Sara’s creations at Costume Renaissance: https://www.etsy.com/shop/CostumeRenaissance?section_id=12065759

goth princess

Busy Crafting

Mini Books for writing or they can be used as a necklace pendant

Mini Book Kit for writing or they can be used as a necklace pendant

I’ve been super busy the last year….crafting. I guess you could call crafting for a living one of the best jobs ever; I think of a craft project, design it, photograph the tutorial steps, lay it out in a design program to make the tutorial and photograph the product photographs. Tiffany and I have been developing our company Lullubee , adding craft of the month categories for pattern kits, needle felting kits, dolls and puppet kits and teddy bear kits. We’ve been working on marketing the business and getting the word out about Lullubee, sourcing cool craft materials and making product videos and video tutorials.

Teddy Bear

Teddy Bear Kit

We’re focusing on the teen and adult market, including seniors. We know that adult children are looking for activities for their elderly parents and we believe crafting is a great outlet for everyone.

Gatsby jewelry

1920’s-style Tassel Necklace Kit

It’s difficult to juggle a start-up business and our daily mother jobs, Tiffany and I often hear complaints of “Mom, we have no clean clothes” or “there’s no food in the house!” We clean Nutella off of shower doors, pick up clothes and shoes that have been left all over the floor, feed and walk our pets as part of our morning routines to prepare for “work”: a day of post office runs, packing kit boxes, meetings and internet work. We often work strange hours to be able to do both jobs;  I work late and Tiffany works early and we often work the same hours even though we’re in two different countries! Did I mention that Tiffany runs our business from NYC and I do my thing from Tel Aviv? Take a look at our social media sites and some of our new products and if you’d share our information with your own networks, it would really help us out:) Thanks!

http://www.lullubee.com/

https://www.facebook.com/Lullubee?ref=hl

http://pinterest.com/lullubee/

https://twitter.com/

Tiny mohair Teddy Bear Kit

Tiny mohair Teddy Bear Kit

 

Bow-tie Jewelry Kit includes materials for earrings, bracelet, necklace and ring.

Bow-tie Jewelry Kit includes materials for earrings, bracelet, necklace and ring.

 

Steampunk Earring utilize real watch parts

Steampunk Earring Kit utilizes real watch parts

 

French Dish Cloth and Rosemary  Salt Kit

French Dish Cloth and Rosemary Salt Kit

 

Painted Mushroom Kit

Painted Mushroom Kit

Needle Felted Apple Bowl

Needle Felted Apple Bowl Kit

Our New-Old Home in Jaffa

May 4, 2013  |  Architecture, Art, Living in Israel

view to the sea e

The ancient, Biblical port city of Jaffa

One of my newest artistic projects is restoring, designing and furnishing an 150 year old-historical piece of vernacular, Ottoman architecture. Basically, we bought a fixer-upper! We’re moving “down the street” from Neve Tzedek to Jaffa (a 15 minute walk) where we will adjust to the very different sea-side city, it’s inhabitants and all Jaffa has to offer. I’ll be documenting the 2nd floor, one story residence through it’s restoration. We’ve hired the architects Paritsky and Liani because we like their clean, modern style; together we will design the house to highlight the original shapes and materials of the structure and combine modern architectural elements that will blend with the ancient. After a brief history of what best illustrates Ottoman architecture,  you will see the interior of our new-old house before any work has started.

studio-courtyard-dining eTurkey ruled the area that is now Israel from the earyly 16th century to 1922; we can see numerous example of vernacular Ottoman architecture throughout Israel. Ottoman architecture can be recognized by a few basic characteristics common to the style: vaulted ceilings, domed ceilings, semi domes, pointed arches, columns, inner and outer courtyards and ornate tile decorations. Ottoman period courtyards were influenced by the Paradise of the Koran; so the garden (courtyard) or Earthly Paradise was designed to represent heaven, a serene place. Decorative motifs were based on nature. Vernacular Ottoman architecture retains the basic Ottoman style but the residential architecture is built with native building materials, forms, and spatial arrangements.

Positive elements of Ottoman architecture are:

  • Thick cement walls to aid in resistance of the vaulted ceilings (arched).:
    Non-combustible, low heat transfer in fires
  • Does not rot, termite-proof at prescribed densities
  • Non-toxic, insulating, creates a healthy micro-climate, feels warm
  • Sound absorbing, neighbors cannot be heard through the walls.
    dining room and front courtyard area e

 front court-yard, studio, dining area bedroom eroots growing in ceiling efront staircase efront steps to the roof eIMG_4138view e

corner room efamily room into a bedroom e